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The third-annual Carbon Friendly Forestry Conference brought together diverse thinkers – policy makers, academics, conservationists, tribes, forest owners, business leaders, and others – to learn about and discuss innovative strategies and opportunities for sustainable forest management that can create a stronger economy and healthier communities in the face of the climate crisis.

The morning consisted of plenary sessions and a panel. After lunch, from 1:00-4:00pm, there were three breakout sessions, and attendees chose to attend one of the two concurrent presentations in each session. The whole group reconvened for a final panel from 4:00-5:00 pm, and ended with a reception from 5:00-6:00pm.

 

Explore the speakers and abstracts below by clicking “View More”

See photos from the event on our Facebook page here

 

For all event inquiries, please contact Sally Paul at sally@wecprotects.org.

AGENDA & SPEAKER INFORMATION

7:00 - 8:00 am

Registration & Breakfast

Breakfast will be provided to attendees 7:00am-8:00am.

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8:00 - 8:15 am

Welcome

Becky Kelley, President, Washington Environmental Council

BIO

Becky joined WEC in 1994 and has led successful campaigns on sustainable forestry and helping to defeat the irresponsible development initiative—Initiative 933. Working closely with architects, developers, and educators, she led WEC’s 2005 campaign to pass Washington’s first-in-the-nation law requiring public buildings to meet green building standards. Currently, Becky serves as WEC President and has previously directed WEC’s Climate and Clean Energy Agenda to pass strong policies to reduce climate pollution and transition to clean energy, as well as staffing our ongoing sustainable forestry work. She feels lucky to have a job where she can help bring people together to create solutions to complex problems, even though it involves an unnatural number of meetings. She has a bachelor’s degree in International Studies from the University of Oregon, and prior to joining WEC, taught English in rural Japan.

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8:15 - 8:45 am

Opening Remarks

Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz

BIO

Elected in 2016, Commissioner of Public Lands Hilary Franz protects and manages nearly six million acres of public lands in Washington State – from coastal waters and aquatic reserves, to working forests and farms, to commercial developments and recreation areas. Commissioner Franz is committed to ensuring our public lands are healthy and productive, both today and for future generations.

She is leading the push to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar, and geothermal infrastructure.

As the leader of our state’s largest wildfire fighting force, she has pushed for new strategies, innovations, and resources to protect our communities.

In order to restore wildfire resilience in our forests, Commissioner Franz developed a 20-year Forest Health Strategic Plan. This plan will make more than one million acres of forest healthier and more resistant to wildfires – a scale and pace that is unprecedented.

She holds a bachelor’s degree from Smith College and a juris doctor from Northeastern University Law School.

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8:45 - 9:25

Washington Forest Carbon Inventory

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Washington forest resources FIA report*

*Note: The forest inventory handout is the latest FIA state report for Washington. It is not the carbon report that contains some of the preliminary results shown in the presentation. However, this report is based on the same 10-year period of time (2007-2016) and FIA plot measurements used in the carbon report, and does include some of the basic carbon stock estimates for the live and dead tree carbon pools.

ABSTRACT

Washington Department of Natural Resources partnered with the U.S. Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Pacific Northwest Research Station to complete a comprehensive forest ecosystem carbon inventory detailing current forest carbon stocks, fluxes and trends on all forest land throughout Washington. A summary of our findings are presented in this overview. This carbon inventory focuses solely on the forest ecosystem and does not include information about carbon in harvested wood products and landfills (this will be a separate study currently being initiated). The Forest Ecosystem Carbon Inventory builds on similar analyses recently completed by FIA in California and Oregon. Total carbon stock estimates are presented for Washington’s forests based on over 6,000 forest inventory plots across all ownerships. Forest carbon pools are summarized for live and dead trees, downed woody material, understory vegetation, forest floor litter, and organic soil carbon. Current rate of carbon dioxide (CO2) flux are presented based on over 2,000 field plots remeasured 10 years apart. We estimate CO2 flux by pool, ownership, ecological region, DNR managed forests, including the statewide rate of annual CO2 sequestration from Washington’s 22 million acres of forest.

Dan Siemann – Executive Policy Advisor, Washington Department of Natural Resources

BIO

Dan Siemann is Executive Policy Advisor at Washington Department of Natural Resources. In this role, he leads an agency-wide effort to identify climate change-related risks and responses to DNR’s forest, aquatic, agricultural and grazing operations. He is also leading efforts to advance carbon management across DNR-managed lands and waters. Prior to DNR, Dan worked in the public, non-profit, and private sectors on environmental and natural resource policy. He helped draft Washington’s 2012 Integrated Climate Change Response Strategy, helped establish the Ruckelshaus Center at UW and WSU and was lead staff for most of the Center’s initial projects. Dan has worked in Asia and Africa and has a BA from UC Santa Cruz and a Master in Public Policy from Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government.

 

Glenn Christensen – Forest Inventory Analyst, US Forest Service

BIO

Glenn Christensen is a Forest Inventory Analyst, at the US Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program, with the Pacific Northwest Research Station in Portland, Oregon. His career with the Forest Service started the day after completing his Masters of Science in Forestry at Oregon State University, researching the effects of silvicultural treatments on wood quality. He was hired by the FIA Program as a Research Forester in 2002 to further study silvicultural treatment opportunities at the landscape scale. In 2006 he began working with the state of California using FIA inventory data to establish the initial forest carbon protocols implemented with California’s carbon emissions cap-and-trade program. He has since worked with FIA’s national and state agency partners in California, Oregon, and Washington focused on forest carbon analysis and reporting efforts informing carbon policy. He also leads FIA’s Timber Products Output (TPO) program at the PNW station, which publishes current forest products industry and timber harvest statistics for the region.

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9:25 - 10:05 am

Carbon Sequestration Projects in Indian Country

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Indian Carbon Connection literature

NICC brochure

ABSTRACT

Formed by the Indian Land Tenure Foundation (ILTF) and the Intertribal Agriculture Council (IAC), the National Indian Carbon Coalition (NICC) is an Indian-led non-profit program that helps tribal nations and tribal member landowners take advantage of carbon credit markets and enter environmental commodities markets through the development of carbon sequestration or offset projects. NICC views these projects as economic development opportunities that preserve tribal nation and tribal member land ownership while returning profits to tribal economies and communities.

Bryan Van Stippen – Project Director, National Indian Carbon Coalition

BIO

Project director Bryan Van Stippen (Oneida Nation of Wisconsin) joined the National Indian Carbon Coalition (NICC) from the Ho-Chunk Nation where he served as a Tribal Attorney for the Department of Justice before transitioning to the Legislative Office. As a Legislative Attorney, he was responsible for land acquisition and other land issues, including fee-to-trust, leasing, right-of-ways, and easements. He is a graduate of the University of North Dakota School of Law (J.D.); the University of Tulsa College of Law (LL.M. in American Indian and Indigenous Law); and the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law (S.J.D in Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy).

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10:05 - 10:30 am

Break

10:30 - 11:45 am

Panel: Getting Mass Timber Right

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ABSTRACT

How do we get mass timber “right”? There are many exciting conversations happening within the forest products and building industries about the prospects of mass timber and tall timber structures, and the opportunity for wood to be a low-carbon building material. The carbon implications of mass timber, however, are far from simple. Variability in the carbon footprint of timber spans the supply chain from the forest to the job site, and the embodied carbon value of mass timber can’t be fully understood until this variability is accounted for. This information gap poses challenges for those developing and delivering on mass timber projects, and seeking truly low-carbon materials.

The panel will address the mass timber conversation from the perspective of demand partners: builders, designers, and clients. The panelists will discuss mass timber project development and procurement, the new Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (EC3) Tool, and what’s missing in the conversation about building with wood.

Don Davies – President, Magnusson Klemencic Associates

BIO

Don Davies is President of Magnusson Klemencic Associates (MKA), a 225 person award-winning structural and civil engineering firm headquartered in Seattle. He is a leader in promoting urban density and low carbon construction, with projects in over 19 countries and up to 105 stories. Recent work includes mass timber office buildings in markets across the US, and collaborative leadership in creating the soon to be released Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (EC3). He frequently lectures on Embodied Carbon Life Cycle Analysis, and is a founding member of the Carbon Leadership Forum, an academic and industry collaboration hosted at the University of Washington.

 

Erica Spiritos – Mass Timber Preconstruction Manager, Swinerton

BIO

Erica has long been interested in the design of urban environments in ways that honor the natural resources on which our lives depend. Following her Civil & Environmental Engineering studies at Carnegie Mellon University, Erica discovered mass timber structures and their potential benefits to the construction industry.  She joined a major mass timber supplier and became a cornerstone of the mass timber movement in the Pacific Northwest, educating the AEC industry and facilitating solutions to deliver eight projects, including both the tallest and the largest CLT projects in the USA. With Swinerton, Erica provides project-specific expertise to support appropriate and optimal mass timber design, estimating, and procurement strategy.

 

Kate Simonen – Director, Carbon Leadership Forum, University of Washington

BIO

Kate Simonen, AIA, SE is founding director of the Carbon Leadership Forum at the University of Washington. Connecting significant professional experience in high performance building design and technical expertise in environmental life cycle assessment, she works to spur collective action to bring net embodied carbon to zero through cutting-edge research, cross-sector collaboration, and the incubation of new approaches. Kate directs the research of the Carbon Leadership Forum and leads collaborative initiatives such as the Embodied Carbon Network, the Embodied Carbon in Construction Calculator (the EC3 tool) and the Structural Engineers 2050 Challenge.

 

Ryan Rideout – Architect, Perkins & Will

BIO

Ryan’s experience has developed throughout various typologies and scales, which have aided each project’s challenges and development. His ability to technically solve design issues displays a strong understanding of materials, which brings unique qualities to every client’s project. His extensive knowledge in single-family residences has been fundamental in progressing the quality of living in multi-family design. Ryan has utilized all mediums of building types and specializes in Mass Timber building techniques that provide sustainable attributes to the project’s overall design. A desire to design quality space is continually pushing his knowledge and creativity toward successful, high-quality projects.

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11:45 - 1:00 pm

Lunch

Lunch will be provided to attendees 12:00pm-1:00pm.

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1:00 - 1:45 pm

Breakout Session 1, Option 1

Managing for Resilience: Leveraging Emerging Technologies for Collaborative Forest Management

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ABSTRACT

Wildfires are considered natural disasters when they impact communities, but there is nothing natural about the recent megafires in the Western U.S.: long-term fire suppression, rapid development at the wildland interface, an aging utility infrastructure, and climate change have created this catastrophe. Our forests are now a tinderbox of fuel, with people the spark for ignition, and extreme weather fanning the flames.

Hardening infrastructure, improving defensible space, and powering down the grid on “fire weather” days are important short term strategies, but not enough to protect lives, property, human health, and ecological resilience. Our business-as-usual approach to forest and wildfire management threatens the capacity of our western forests to provide climate mitigation and economically sustainable benefits. We need a new approach to risk mapping in this era of megafire and a new approach to forest management.

This talk will focus on the use of new technologies like deep learning, nanosatellite imagery, and cloud-computing to bring wildfire hazard mapping, land management, carbon mapping, and ecosystem services into the modern age—fueling collective action at scale.

Brent Davies – VP of Forests & Ecosystem Services, Ecotrust

BIO

Brent Davies is Ecotrust’s Vice President of Forests and Ecosystem Services. In this role, Brent oversees the organization’s Forest Carbon, Drinking Water, Tribal Forestry, and Watershed Restoration initiatives. She has spent the last two decades working with tribes, local and regional nonprofits, private landowners, businesses, and government agencies to develop and implement conservation, restoration, and economic development strategies. She has co-led the development of several conservation planning tools, including Forest Planner, a user-friendly, online tool that allows landowners to visualize how changes in their forest practices affect revenue and the production of timber and other ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration. Brent received a Master of Science degree from the University of Washington’s College of Forest Resources. She currently serves on the Washington Forest Practices Board and the US Board of Directors for the Forest Stewardship Council. Brent is based in eastern Washington and also assists in the management of her family’s Oregon forestland.

 

David Marvin – Co-founder & CEO, Salo Sciences

BIO

Dr. David Marvin is a forest ecologist and remote sensing scientist. His academic research focused on forest carbon, forest disturbance, and GHG flux modeling of land management under climate change scenarios. Recently, Dr. Marvin co-founded Salo Sciences, a conservation analytics & monitoring company that provides high resolution monitoring services and analytics of forest cover, structure, function, and disturbance. Salo uses three key tools—satellite data, artificial intelligence & ecological modeling—to identify conservation opportunities, monitor ecosystem health & predict environmental change with a mission to accelerate nature-based solutions to climate change and biodiversity loss.

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1:00 - 1:45 pm

Breakout Session 1, Option 2

Funding Forest Conservation and Tree Planting Through Forest Carbon Credits

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ABSTRACT

Carbon credits have been traded for over twenty years. But urban forests and small forested properties have been left out of the carbon equation.

Liz Johnston from City Forest Credits will discuss urban forest carbon, focusing on the work of Seattle-based non-profit City Forest Credits to enable local tree planting and preservation projects to earn and sell carbon credits. City Forest Credits offers a proven framework that allows companies to invest their carbon offset or social impact dollars locally, near where their employees, customers and stakeholders live, work and play. She will discuss how urban forest carbon works, where projects are being implemented, and what lies ahead.

Kathleen Farley Wolf from King County will discuss the King County Forest Carbon Program, which was developed to increase carbon stored in King County rural and urban forests, provide valuable co-benefits, support accelerated acquisition of high-priority conservation lands in association with the Land Conservation Initiative, and to engage the business community in conservation by providing an option for local, high-quality, 3rd party-verified carbon credits. The program includes an urban forest carbon pilot project with City Forest Credits and the development of a Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) rural forest carbon project. She will provide an overview of the opportunities and challenges associated with developing these projects, and what lies ahead.

Kathleen Farley Wolf – Forestry Program, King County Department of Natural Resources and Parks

BIO

Kathleen Farley Wolf has been working on forest management and conservation for the past 20 years. She joined the King County Forestry Program in 2018, where she is developing strategies for long-term forest conservation in King County, including creating incentives for forest management that enhance carbon sequestration and support rural landowners. Prior to joining King County, she spent 12 years as a professor in the Geography Department at San Diego State University and held positions with EcoCiencia, a nonprofit in Ecuador, Duke University, and The Nature Conservancy, focused on management of forest and grassland ecosystems in North and South America.

 

Liz Johnston – Director, City Forest Credits

BIO

As Director at City Forest Credits, Liz works with local stakeholders in cities across the country who are leading the development of city forest carbon projects. Tree-planting and preservation projects strengthen communities by providing environmental, economic, and social benefits, while also generating new funding from Carbon+ Credits and sustainability investments.

Liz has over a decade of experience working in the Pacific Northwest and internationally leading complex projects and driving change through environmental and social impact programs. As Director of Conservation Planning and Strategy at Forterra, Liz developed and led strategic partnerships with government agencies, tribes and businesses in land acquisition and community impact projects. At The Forest Trust, she managed client relationships with Fortune Global 500 companies for their responsible sourcing programs, providing guidance and innovative solutions to reduce risk and drive sustainable values in their product supply chains at the farm and forest level. Liz grew up in Seattle, Washington and holds a B.S. from Western Washington University in Environmental Science.

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2:00 - 2:45 pm

Breakout Session 2, Option 1

Sealaska’s Carbon Project

ABSTRACT

Sealaska is Southeast Alaska’s regional Native corporation, with more than 22,000 Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian shareholders. Sealaska manages 362,000 acres of traditional homeland of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian people. Our goal is to create the greatest financial, cultural and community benefit from these lands. In 2016, we began Sealaska’s first carbon offset project by setting aside 165,000 acres of forested land. This aligns with our deep connection to environmental stewardship while ensuring opportunities with the land for future generations.

Mitchell Haldane – Carbon Offset Administrator, Sealaska Corporation

BIO

Mitchell Haldane serves as Sealaska’s carbon offset administrator and is based in Juneau, Alaska. Mitchell attended Central Washington University and obtained a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies. As the carbon offset administrator, Mitchell is responsible for compliance of Sealaska’s carbon offset projects.

In his free time, Mitchell enjoys hiking and being outdoors. While at Central Washington University, he played football and carries that passion for sports now as a coach for Juneau’s unified varsity high school football team.

His history with Sealaska began as an intern in Sealaska’s natural resource department, working on Sealaska’s first carbon project inventory. He later interned and worked for Sealaska Environmental Services, collecting groundwater samples throughout the Pacific Northwest and remote Alaska.

Mitchell is Tlingit, Eagle, Wooshkeetaan and Tsimshian. He was born and raised in Mountlake Terrace, Washington.

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2:00 - 2:45 pm

Breakout Session 2, Option 2

Family Forest Carbon Program

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ABSTRACT

The Nature Conservancy and American Forest Foundation are partnering to develop a Family Forest Carbon Program (FFCP).  The FFCP will offer payments to family landowners for implementing carbon-friendly forest practices. The Program innovates Natural Climate Solutions (NCS) models with two critical advances: 1. Piloting the first working model of a forest carbon incentive program.  With NCS currently funded almost entirely through offset markets, new models are urgently needed that can be adopted to meet state, federal and corporate needs.  2.  Developing an innovative carbon accounting approach through a third-party voluntary carbon standard that dramatically reduces cost. Rather than basing payments on costly inventories of carbon as traditional carbon offset projects do, the program will incentivize specific forest management practices that have been scientifically demonstrated to enhance carbon sequestration.

Josh Parrish – Working Woodlands Program Director, The Nature Conservancy

BIO

Josh is the Director of the Working Woodlands Program. He focuses on two primary strategies for expanding the program across the United States. The first is working across The Nature Conservancy’s business units to engage and enroll landowners in the Program by providing them with long-term innovative conservation solutions. The second strategy is developing and expanding the forest carbon credit sales pipeline by building relationships with corporations and other interested purchasers.

In the Program, landowners are provided pathways and opportunities to promote sustainable forest management while realizing new revenue streams through forest carbon. Since starting the program in 2009, Josh led the enrollment of over 92,000 acres of forestland across the U.S. including developing Pennsylvania’s first carbon project in 2012. He has extensive experience in assessing and providing voluntary and compliance carbon market solutions to forest landowners.

Josh holds a bachelor’s degree in Professional Accountancy from Penn State University. On the weekends, he enjoys actively managing his own conserved working forest to practice the silviculture he promotes through Working Woodlands. Josh is a native of Pennsylvania’s Central Appalachian Mountains and enjoys his time in the woods there with his wife and two young daughters.

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3:00 - 3:45 pm

Breakout Session 3, Option 1

Chimacum Ridge Carbon Friendly Forest Management Easement: A Pilot in State Investment and Partnerships

ABSTRACT

Managing forests to enhance carbon sequestration values while also continuing to produce timber and non-timber forest products will be increasingly important as humanity attempts to reduce global carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere. Forestlands in the Pacific Northwest have an outsized role to play in this effort, and a pilot WA state-funded forestland conservation easement was recently achieved in east Jefferson County, WA on the Olympic Peninsula, which permanently ensures climate-friendly forestry on the 853-acre Chimacum Ridge working forest property. There is potential for replication of this type of state investment, to incentivize more private forestland owners to ensure permanent management of timberlands in a way that produces greater climate resilience, and other conservation values. This session will outline the partnerships and approach that led to this important conservation outcome.

Bettina von Hagen – CEO, EFM

BIO

Bettina co-founded Ecotrust Forest Management (EFM) in 2004 and has served as CEO since 2008. EFM is a B-certified forestland investment company that creates financial value for investors while significantly improving environmental conditions at the landscape scale and creating jobs and opportunities for local communities, with over $150 million of assets and 100,000 acres of forestland under management. EFM also advises on natural climate solutions in North and South America with a focus on the Amazon. Prior to joining EFM, Bettina was a Vice President at non-profit Ecotrust, investing and managing its Natural Capital Fund, a 100% impact investment fund, and launching and growing programs in forestry and ecosystem services.

Prior to joining Ecotrust, she was a Vice President and commercial lender at First Interstate Bank of Oregon and led the Bank’s first environmental task force. Bettina holds an MBA from the University of Chicago and a BA in Biology and History from the University of the Pacific. She currently serves on the board of Forest Trends, EFM, and Ecotrust Capital and previously served on the boards of the Climate Trust and the Verified Carbon Standard Association. Bettina holds dual US and Peruvian citizenship.

Erik Kingfisher – Stewardship Director, Jefferson Land Trust

BIO

Erik is responsible for the leadership and direction of Jefferson Land Trust’s stewardship program. He works directly with landowners, volunteers, and other partners to monitor, protect, and restore conservation easement protected properties, and supports the Preserve Manager with the stewardship of the Land Trust-owned Preserves. Erik has been working in land conservation since 1999, and has been the Stewardship Director with Jefferson Land Trust since 2008. He has been an active leader in the Washington Association of Land Trusts since its founding, and was President 2013-2014. With a BA in Environmental Education, and an MA in Environmental Politics, he also created and annually operates the Land Trust’s popular Tidelands to Timberline adult natural history course, and supervises other On-The-Land-Learning community engagement programs of the Land Trust.

Richard Corff – Washington Director of Land Conservation, The Trust for Public Land

BIO

Richard has an undergraduate degree in business and a Master’s degree in Environmental Studies with a focus on Environmental Economics. He worked for the Washington State Department of Natural Resources through much of the 1990s doing land management and environmental planning, then the King County Land and Water Resources Group for 3.5 years practicing conservation real estate. Richard then spent 9+ years as a licensed Real Estate Broker working in both the residential and commercial markets of the private sector. Even there, he focused on the re-sale market using innovative marketing technics to guide people back to existing neighborhoods and commercial areas with existing infrastructure rather than out to “new development” tied to suburban sprawl.

8 years ago Richard moved back to my first love, conservation work. The Trust for Public Land was a natural fit. First, as a Project Manager and now as the Washington Director of Land Conservation, he oversees the Washington team and has personally completed projects in partnership with the Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, King County, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, the US Forest Service and the Department of Defense’s Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration (REPI) program enabling people to get up into the mountains and forests of Washington State as well as supporting working forests and working farms around Washington and Oregon.

Working with large landowners including Rayonier, Pope Resources, Ecotrust Forest Management (EFMI), Richard has completed projects conserving thousands of acres of working forest, riparian corridors, forested wetlands, and helped to create community forests. Much of this work has involved innovative funding approaches.

Sarah Spaeth – Director of Conservation and Strategic Partnerships, Jefferson Land Trust

BIO

Sarah grew up in the Northwest, in Seattle and the San Juan Islands. She received her undergraduate degree in marine biology from Western Washington University and a graduate degree in coastal zone management from the School of Marine Affairs at the University of Washington. Sarah was originally hired as a project coordinator in 1996 for what was then called the North Quimper Peninsula Wildlife Corridor. She has served as Jefferson Land Trust’s Executive Director, and now oversees projects and partnerships in her role as Director of Conservation. She works closely with landowners and community members, as well as governmental and non-profit agencies to shepherd land projects through to protection. Prior to working at Jefferson Land Trust, she served as a marine consultant with the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, along with a long stint working on natural history charter boats in Southeast Alaska.

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3:00 - 3:45pm

Breakout Session 3, Option 2

Missing the Forest: How Forest Practices Impact the Carbon Embodied in Mass Timber Projects

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ABSTRACT

The drive to advance sustainability in the built environment is fueling demand for greater transparency and rigorous documentation of environmental impacts of materials and their supply chains, specifically around carbon. Despite significant and growing interest among green builders in using wood, and mass timber products in particular, supply chain traceability and the embodied carbon impacts attributable to wood products generated from different regions, forest management systems, and certifications remains a black box.

Research in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests from Ecotrust and the University of Washington that debuted at Carbon Friendly Forestry in 2017 clearly illustrated how forest practices that go above-and-beyond minimum Oregon and Washington regulations deliver additional carbon storage which can be directly translated into an “upstream” embodied carbon benefit associated with the wood produced from these alternative management approaches.

This year, we will share new research from Ecotrust and The Miller Hull Partnership exploring the impact that the inclusion of forest practices brings to estimates of the embodied carbon of mass timber products and whole-building Life Cycle Assessments. The scale of “upstream” forest carbon storage factors from alternative sourcing options will be compared to the other stages in the wood product life cycle and rolled up into real-world buildings to compare the impact of wood sourcing decisions with those of alternative non-wood designs employing concrete and steel.

Chris Hellstern – Living Building Challenge Services Director, The Miller Hull Partnership

BIO

Chris Hellstern, AIA, LFA, LEED AP BD+C, CDT is the Living Building Challenge Services Director, architect and author with The Miller Hull Partnership in Seattle with a variety of project experience including two certified Living Buildings and several more currently in design and construction. His book, Living Building Education, chronicles the story behind his first Living Building, the Bertschi School.  A Living Future Accredited professional and a Living Building Challenge Hero, Chris also co-founded the Healthy Materials Collaborative.  He publishes articles and volunteers with local school groups mentoring students about sustainable practices.  As an Affiliate Instructor with the University of Washington, Chris teaches a graduate sustainability course.

 

David Diaz – Director of Forestry Technology & Analytics, Ecotrust

BIO

David Diaz has reported on international climate negotiations, developed how-to-guides for forest carbon projects, designed carbon market accounting standards, and negotiated contracts for carbon offsets. Since 2013, he has worked with the nonprofit Ecotrust where he serves as Director of Forestry Technology & Analytics. David leads work to integrate open-source data science, geospatial analysis, and forest ecology and management to produce actionable science, user-friendly technologies, and data-driven insights that engage forest owners and enable improved forest management. He holds a BA in Environmental History from Harvard University, an MS in Soil Science from Oregon State University, and is a PhD candidate in the University of Washington School of Environmental and Forest Sciences.

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4:00 - 5:00 pm

Panel: Promoting Natural Climate Solutions

Darcy Nonemacher – Government Affairs Director, Washington Environmental Council

BIO

Darcy works across WEC’s program areas to pass and defend environmental laws and secure public funding for essential programs and projects. Darcy has more than a decade of experience in environmental law and policy issues including land and water conservation, renewable energy development, water law, toxic pollution cleanup and prevention, salmon and steelhead recovery, and budgeting. She also has experience managing high-profile election campaigns in several states and worked with the AFL-CIO to create an affiliate organization for non-union households. Darcy has a bachelor’s degree from the University of Connecticut and a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law.

 

Jason Callahan – Director of Governmental Relations, Washington Forest Protection Association

BIO

Jason Callahan serves as the Director of Government Relations for the Washington Forest Protection Association, a trade association representing Washington’s private forest landowners, where he advocates for sustainable forestry as a preferred land use. Prior to coming to WFPA, he was a senior committee counsel with the Washington State House of Representatives where he was non-partisan legislative staff assigned to the Environment Committee and the Agriculture & Natural Resources Committee. A native of the great state of New Jersey, Jason has an undergraduate degree in Wildlife Resource Management from the West Virginia University College of Forestry, and a law degree from Florida State University. He has worked for or around the Washington State Legislature, and has been a member of the Washington State Bar, since the year 2000.

 

Kaola Swanson – Oregon Program Director, Pacific Forest Trust

BIO

Kaola Swanson is the Oregon Program Director for Pacific Forest Trust (PFT). PFT works with landowners and communities to sustain forests for all of their public benefits of wood, water, wildlife, and people’s well-being. Kaola’s role is to expand on PFT’s twenty year history of working in Oregon, including advancing policy efforts and the implementation of working forest conservation easements on the ground. Prior to her work with PFT, Kaola was Conservation Programs Director for The Freshwater Trust where she focused on developing investment strategies and systems to increase the pace and scale of freshwater conservation. Kaola holds a bachelor’s degree in Environmental Science from the University of Oregon and a master’s degree in Environmental Management from the Nicholas School at Duke University. She is deeply committed to the concept of the radical middle and finding practical solutions that meet the needs of the environment, economy, and society.

 

Reed Schuler, Senior Policy Advisor – Climate and Sustainability, Office of Governor Jay Inslee

BIO

Reed Schuler is a Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Jay Inslee of Washington State, where he focuses on climate change issues. Previously, Reed served at the U.S. Department of State as a U.S. negotiator for the Paris Agreement on climate change and then on Secretary of State John Kerry’s Policy Planning Staff, the Secretary’s independent policy and strategy office. As a Paris Agreement negotiator, he managed the U.S. diplomatic effort to galvanize all countries in the world to submit ambitious climate action targets, and led the U.S. technical group to analyze these targets. He also served on the small team that negotiated the groundbreaking 2014 U.S.-China presidential announcement of the U.S. and Chinese climate targets. On the Policy Planning Staff, Reed managed the climate change, energy, environment, science and technology, health, and foreign assistance portfolios, and chaired the State Department’s task force on climate security and resilience. In this capacity, he helped lead the effort to bring the Paris Agreement into force. Reed has conducted research in urban development, transportation, and sustainability as a Fulbright Fellow in Shanghai, China, led an energy efficiency and renewable energy strategy initiative with Mass Audubon and the social impact consulting group New Sector Alliance, and started and managed an innovative, cross-sector community engagement and energy efficiency program for the Baltimore Office of Sustainability and the Baltimore Community Foundation.

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5:00 - 6:00 pm

Reception & Happy Hour

Hors d’oeuvres will be provided, and beverages will be available for purchase.

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Emcee

Sapna Sopori

Sapna Sopori – Founder and CEO, Sapna Strategies, LLC; WEC Board Member

BIO

Sapna was born in Arizona as a first generation Indian-American, raised by a single-mother whose own challenges and opportunities in this country shaped her understanding of the intersection between race, gender, and immigrant-status. She has spent 18 years working in the environmental sector. As a leader, educator, and activist, Sapna works with organizations to decolonize their programs to ensure that the good work they hope to do in the world is not undermined by how they do it. She also teaches a graduate course on Nonprofit Leadership and Administration, in which the next generation of nonprofit leaders are challenged to uncover and address the hidden biases within administrative systems, from hiring practices to board development to fundraising. In her personal time, Sapna is active with and learns from the Seattle chapter of the Environmental Professionals of Color. She is also a Senior Fellow with the Environmental Leadership Program and has facilitated their Fellows of Color Affinity Group. In 2017, she was honored with the Kitsap YWCA’s Mission Award for Eliminating Racism and Empowering Women. Sapna has been so fortunate to have all of these life experiences as a result of the generosity, courage, and support of those around her, and with every action she takes, she strives to honor her community’s belief in her.

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