News and Stories

Record-Breaking Number of Comments Pours in Against Proposed Tesoro-Savage Oil Terminal

Over 300,000 comments and almost 2,000 hearing attendees say NO to largest proposed oil terminal in nation.

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Microsoft buys carbon credits in forest near Rainier to offset pollution

Microsoft bought carbon credits certified by a California regulatory program that will preserve 520 acres of forest near Mount Rainier.

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Army Corps rejects permit for coal terminal at Cherry Point

The Army Corps ruled that the proposed coal terminal for Cherry Point would impact the treaty-protected fishing rights of Lummi Nation.

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Make the Clean Air Rule More Effective

As carbon shrinks and clean energy grows, we will be further on the path to protecting all people from the harms of climate change.

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Our mission is to protect, restore, and sustain
Washington’s environment.

History and Victories | View all »

2015

Washington’s First California-Certified Project

For the first time in the Pacific Northwest, a forest carbon project has been verified under the rigorous carbon offset protocol in California's cap-and-trade program. The Nisqually Carbon Project will generate 37,000 carbon offset credits after the first verification, with more to come in later years. This first batch is equivalent to taking 6,000 cars off the road. Microsoft, working with Natural Capital Partners, purchased the vast majority of the credits, 35,000, as part of its ongoing voluntary commitment to being carbon neutral, a growing national trend by companies to address climate change.

2015

Standing Up To Oil

WEC is a founding member of Stand Up to Oil, a growing coalition of groups opposed to new oil terminals and an increase in oil transport through the Northwest, while working to improve safety measures for oil currently traveling through the region. Oil transported by train, pipeline, and tanker vessels impacts all of Washington – from Spokane to Vancouver to Grays Harbor to Bellingham. We are working to stop proposed oil terminals in Vancouver and Grays Harbor, an oil by rail expansion at the Shell Refinery in Anacortes, and potential refinery in Longview.

2013

Record Opposition to Coal Export

Almost 300,000 Washingtonians live within a half mile of the rail lines that would carry 145 million tons of coal through the Northwest each year. These communities are natural audiences to target for outreach. However, Washington’s environmental base is not necessarily located in many of the communities along the rail lines. Using modeling tools, WEC identified and engaged people likely to care about coal export and the impact of coal trains on their lives. Voter Education Program tools helped drive people to scoping hearings for the Cherry Point proposal. Turn-out was amazing – 10,000 people attended hearings across the Northwest, most in opposition to the proposals. In addition, more than 120,000 comments were submitted to the state about the proposed Cherry Point export facility, a record.

2012

Protecting Maury Island

For a dozen years, environmental advocates worked to prevent a mine from being built on Maury Island, the longest stretch of undeveloped Puget Sound waterfront remaining in King County. If mined, Washington would have lost the once-in-a-lifetime chance to protect this natural beach, wild madrona bluffs and network of trails. WEC, along with our partners Preserve Our Islands and People For Puget Sound, were involved in efforts to protect Maury Island even before it was established as an aquatic reserve. Finally, thanks to the work of so many people, Maury Island remains a place for our children and their children to gaze across Puget Sound to the shoulders of Mount Rainier, to enjoy the natural wonders of our inland waters, from tiny crabs to majestic Orcas. Through dedicated conservation funding from the state government and King County and private donations, this iconic bluff and beach property has been purchased and preserved.

2011

Transitioning off Coal to Clean Energy

The TransAlta Centralia coal plant is Washington’s largest single source of air pollution. Working in coalition, WEC helped come up with an agreement to phase out the power plant between 2020 and 2025. As a result, 10 million tons of CO2 will be eliminated annually, putting our state one step closer to a truly coal-free Washington. A $55 million fund was also established to support the local community during this transition, as well as a requirement TransAlta install certain pollution controls prior to shutting down the boilers. This campaign helped jumpstart the fight against coal export terminals by developing a grassroots base for coal issues.